Chris Gates at SB Nation speculated about the events the new Vikings stadium may attract, including the chances of getting a Super Bowl. Gates seems to think the chances are pretty good:

Super Bowl
This is the obvious one that people are going to point to. The Metrodome hosted a Super Bowl back in 1992. The game was relatively horrible, remembered more for Buffalo Bills’ running back Thurman Thomas misplacing his helmet on the sidelines during the first series of the game than for the game itself, but it was the only time Minneapolis has hosted the game. The NFL schedules the locations for the Super Bowl a few years in advance, but if recent history is any indication, once the new stadium opens, it will be in line to host the big game in short order.

Here are some cities in the past 15 years that did not get a Super Bowl after building a new stadium:

- Washington, D.C.
- Baltimore
- Cleveland
- Nashville
- Cincinnati
- Denver
- Pittsburgh
- Seattle
- Boston
- St. Louis

How come? During that stretch, the Super Bowl was hosted 3 times in Miami and New Orleans; twice in Tampa Bay, San Diego, and Phoenix.

There are 32 teams in a league that prefers playing their premier game in February in outdoor stadiums in the South; in a league that considers stadiums obsolete in 30 years. Even if Super Bowls were evenly distributed, the NFL tears down stadiums at a faster rate than they have Super Bowls.

While the Vikings stadium corporate welfare package was sold based on the potential of hosting a Super Bowl, there is no guarantee.

Compare that to Indianapolis’ contact with the Colts:

Indianapolis did get a Super Bowl. Perhaps that language in their contract helped make that happen?

Indy also locked in four additional NFL days per year at their stadium by continuing to host the NFL Scouting Combine.

This was a great stadium bill for the NFL, since they got a ton while promising nothing.