Minnehaha Dairy Queen’s New Bike Drive Thru

Dairy Queen's Bike Drive Thru

What what I’ve heard, the window on the side of the new Dairy Queen near Minnehaha Park is going to be used as a bike drive thru. As far as I know, this is the first of its kind in Minneapolis. I can imagine this filling up with families in their 6-person bike rentals from the park.

While in the ‘hood, I found an interesting display of handicap parking failure where this SUV managed to screw things up for not one by two handicap spots by parking in the buffer zone between the spots.

Parking Between Handicap Spots at DQ

It turns out that there is a reason for those stripes of paint on the pavement.

9 thoughts on “Minnehaha Dairy Queen’s New Bike Drive Thru”

  1. Bike Drive-Thru!!! I like the sound of that! THANK YOU, DQ! For the record, however, I feel like I should point out that otherwise, the new DQ building is unfortunate in terms of urban design and land use intensity. It fails to make efficient use of the real estate it consumes

  2. Ed, what is the primary disconnect with you people?
    You wrote:
    “While in the ‘hood, I found an interesting display of handicap parking failure where this SUV managed to screw things up for not one by two handicap spots by parking in the buffer zone between the spots.”
    Did the SUV really park there on it’s own? Perhaps You should demonize the moron who actually drove and parked there. This is the type of madness which suggests people are not responsible for their own actions. You should have posted a picture of the idiot as they were getting into their vehicle. For all we know, this is your evil SUV!
    As for the bike drive thru; thats great! Now bicyclists can continue to ignore traffic laws, and roll through a stop sign while eating ice cream! Where’s the concern for the “personal safety”? At least they will have a tasty treat to eat while lying on the pavement. Lets keep in mind; some people can not walk and chew bubblegum at the same time! Maybe people like yourself will just blame the actions on the bike and not the rider.
    Also, come on Reuben! Where is it your right to tell a private property owner how they should layout their private property. Sounds kinda fascist to me!
    Then the fascist says:
    Das, ich kenne Sie am besten Idiot

  3. Kirk, I think your values and that of a typical Minneapolis resident may not be fully aligned. As I see it, people living in Minneapolis like to have laws in place that keep strip clubs from opening next to schools or drive thrus in high pedestrian and bike traffic areas. This isn’t fascism. The laws are not being imposed upon the citizens of the city.

    I was going to suggest that you move to Houston, Texas, where zoning laws tend to be more lax than in Minneapolis. However, even Houston is imposing restrictions on how businesses can use their private property by making strip clubs operate more than 1,500 feet from schools, day cares, and churches (and 1,000 feet from each other). People got together and decided what kind of city they wanted to live in and did something about it. Again, not fascist.

  4. @kirk – experience has taught me that it is usually best to ignore trollish comments, especially when people start accusing others of fascism, but I’ve got nothing better to do right now, so I’ll take the bait. No, it’s not currently my right to tell DQ how to lay out their property (though it would be if I were a member of the city zoning and planning committee…). It is my right, however, to state that the building is ugly, something I expect the architect him/herself would admit to his/her closest friends. It’s also my right to observe that the building, by design, encourages customers to arrive via automobile rather than on foot. It’s also my right to observe that the building doesn’t attempt to fit in architecturally with the surrounding neighborhood. It’s also my right to observe that the nearly half acre lot could have easily supported a DQ and, say, a half-dozen residential units. Before you say it, yes, I am quite aware of the many reasons why it is in DQ’s best interests to stamp out the same design for all their locations regardless of neighborhood context. But the building is still ugly.

  5. Reuben,
    The city would never receive the same amount of taxes from six residential units. Are you suggesting the city raise taxes residents to take place of the commercial property. Commercial property owners pay two to three times the property tax of a residential piece of property of the same size. Ya that right, DQ’s parking lot brings in more taxes for the city. Also, my guess is that DQ is taxed without representation. By the way Reuben; Parts of your house are also ugly! Fix those soffits & fascia, your uglying up the neighborhood! Perhaps you would like DQ to give you suggestions on color or materials. Also Reuben, Did you pull a permit for those upcoming remodel projects? Don’t tell us your avoiding city fees and taxes.
    To see if you need one go to http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/mdr/permits/buildingpermits/index.asp
    Remember once you touch it, the city inspector will require it to be properly fixed, like those basement stairs. They do look like their magically supported.
    http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/contact/email-form-codeviol.asp
    and ED, Until the local business gets a say as to future city planning without the owner of that business living there; it is a form of fascism. “taxation without representation” Remember without that “ugly” business there, your neighborhood residential taxes would soar!
    And Ed, I was born here. Why in the hell would I move to Texas.

  6. “Taxation without representation” means that a person has NO avenue to be represented but are still taxed. The current residents of DC who have no official say in Congress are taxed without representation. I don’t understand the owners of that DQ to be residents of Washington DC. This is the first I’ve heard of this phrase being used to argue that someone should have a vote within any jurisdiction they do business in even though they don’t live there. Surely one can see that is problematic in a number of ways.

    People should be able to make decisions on how their community is run. If someone wants to run a business in their community, they should be expected to do things by the community’s rules, even if they are dumb rules.

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