Review: On Target: How the World’s Hottest Retailer Hit a Bull’s-Eye

I’ve started reading the 2003 book, On Target, which takes a glowing look at how Minnesota’s favorite big box chain retailer came to be what it is today.

Clearly, a book with the subtitle, “How the World’s Hottest Retailer Hit a Bull’s-Eye” is going to present the company favorably at every opportunity.

So far, the writing has come across as elitist and mean to me. For example,

“Wal-Mart, which is the nation’s largest seller of apparel, may have Target in its crosshairs, but for the down-home discounter to actually compete on Target’s turf would take a cultural and image revolution – one that would risk alienating its traditional customers, who are far more interested in saving hard-earned money on toilet paper and snack food than seeking a Mossimo tee to pair with Armani slacks, or a Michael Graves toaster to complement a stainless steel Sub-Zero refrigerator.”

The author does seem to capture the Target culture with that spin.

In my opinion, Target’s specialty is their ability run up women’s Target credit cards by convincing them to measure their self-worth based on whether their napkins are in season, or what their can opener says about them as a person, rather than focusing on saving a few bucks on household staples.

3 thoughts on “Review: On Target: How the World’s Hottest Retailer Hit a Bull’s-Eye”

  1. Target’s specialty is their ability run up women’s Target credit cards by convincing them to measure their self-worth based on whether their napkins are in season, or what their can opener says about them as a person

    Speaking of elitist and mean…

  2. @etc, are you suggesting that describing Target’s successful merchandising strategies makes me elitist and mean? What happened to not shooting the messenger?

  3. Pingback: Corporate Babysitter » Blog Archive » Sitter’s Checklist: Links 7.13.09

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