Wisconsin Environment Press ConferencePacker fans are still recovering from their playoff loss. But thanks to Wisconsin Environment, they now have a new justification for their less than stellar seasons in recent history: the environment.

“As if we needed another reason to tackle global warming, now even the Green Bay Packers could be affected,” said LuCinda Hohmann, Field Organizer with Wisconsin Environment. “Congress and the state legislature must get serious about global warming before rising temperatures fumble away the Packers home field advantage.”

National trends from recent seasons suggest that a home field advantage for cold weather teams over their warm weather rivals may truly exist. Wisconsin Environment pointed to the National Football League’s 14 cold weather teams having won 65 percent of their home games played after Halloween against warm weather teams from 1998 through 2005.

But wasn’t Green Bay’s playoff loss one – if not the – coldest playoff game in the history of the NFL? Don’t let an outlier like that get in the way of the larger trend:

The Green Bay Packers had the largest temperature increase during the last seven seasons, a 4.1 degrees Fahrenheit increase as compared to the previous thirty years. This is significant in comparison to the next highest temperature rise of only 2.9 degrees.

As far as I can tell, global warming really started impacting the Packers after the 1998 season. You can’t blame the 1998 Superbowl loss on global warming, but you could blame the next 10 seasons on it.