Saddam’s Dead. Do You Feel Safer?

The only time I truly felt threatened by Saddam Hussein was when Colin Powell went to the United Nations and lied about weapons of mass destruction. If it wasn’t for Powell’s compelling yet completely dishonest presentation to the United Nations, I don’t believe we would have invaded Iraq.

Colin Powell, I hold you personally responsible for the death of every American soldier who’s died in Iraq and the deaths of tens of thousands of Iraqi citizens.
Had Powell not lied to the United Nations, there’s a very good chance that Saddam Hussein would still be alive. While I’m pretty indifferent to the health of Hussein, I think it’s dispicable that 3,000 American soldiers have lost their lives in a trumped up war justified by making Saddam Hussein seem like an imminent threat to America. We now know that we were fed a load of crap, yet more soldiers will die tommorrow, the day after tomorrow, and the day after that. In fact, our president would like to increase then number of American soldiers in harm’s way.

Would Saddam have been a threat to America if we surrounded Iraq militarily, put sanctions on the country, and built up a world-wide coalition of countries opposed to any aggresive moves by Iraq? Of course not. And this could have been done without dropping a single bomb. Without sacrificing a single soldier’s life. But it would have involved maturity beyond the capability of our current president.
Do I feel better knowing Saddam Hussein is dead? Absolutely not. He presented no threat to me sitting in jail, so killing him simply makes a martyr out of him leading to even more hostility against the United States.

3 thoughts on “Saddam’s Dead. Do You Feel Safer?”

  1. Since I have such disdain for the death penalty, I am always saddened when this is how we punish someone. That being said, I don’t really feel bad (or feel anything) for Saddam; I just think it’s unfortunate his death could somehow ease someone else’s pain (if I ever have a family member who is the victim of a capital crime, maybe I’ll change my opinion on this).

    What is interesting and a little creepy to me is that I believe a lot of people in this country would agree with exactly what you have wrtitten. Mostly because public support for the war is low right now. However, if Saddam was put to death when he was first captured, when public support for the war was high, maybe these very same people would react differently. Maybe they would say the world is safer with Saddam dead and with Iraq broken into a million Saddam-less pieces.

    And this is reason #623 why I oppose the death penalty. Support for it and support for who should live and die while being punished is so subjective. Not only will two people have two different opinions about who should die, but the same individual might change his/her mind over time.

  2. I’m not sure what motivates people to support the death penalty. Is revenge considered justice? Do people think the death penalty is a crime deterrent? Who commits a crime with the expectation of being caught?

  3. The death penalty is one topic I can’t stop ranting against.

    For the cost it takes to execute someone, you can buy a lot of psychotherapy and counseling for family members of capital crime victims. I think for victims’ families, revenge is their primary reason for wanting the death penalty. But it just makes one more dead person. The relief from grief has to be temporary. I understand how convicting the criminal brings peace and closure to a family”s grief, but I don’t see how killing him does.

    In terms of it being a deterrent, well that’s just plain wrong if you look at the capital crime rate in state’s with the death penalty vs. states without.

    And why is it that blacks who kill whites are put to death at a significantly higher rate than blacks who other blacks? That is fucked up.

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